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Vegetable Growing

Growing Oca

The Oca is first thought to have been grown by the Incas in South America but are hugely popular in New Zealand also and are increasing in popularity in this country too with the first farmers taking to growing them commercially recently.They can be used like a small potato and have a slightly citrous flavour.  Great raw in salads too!

RhubarbRhubarb

Rhubarb is grown primarily for its fleshy stalks, technically known as petioles. The use of rhubarb stems as food is a relatively recent innovation, first recorded in 17th century England, after affordable sugar became available to common people, and reaching a peak between the 20th century's two world wars. Sometimes thought as a fruit it is indeed a vegetable

ParnipsParnips

 A roast dinner isn’t complete without roast parsnips – and they add a whole new dimension to stews and casseroles too.The good news is parsnips are easy to grow, need little maintenance and can be left in the garden until you’re ready to use them. Sow in spring and you’ll have parsnips in the autumn.

Spaghetti SquashSpaghetti Squash

These are a versatile if not unusual vegetable, technically a fruit really.  The spaghetti squash is an oblong seed-bearing variety of winter squash. The fruit can range either from ivory to yellow or orange in colour. The orange varieties have a higher carotene content. Its centre contains many large seeds.

PumpkinsGrowing Pumpkins & Winter Squash

One of the most fun vegetables to grow is the pumpkin, especially for children, who can't wait to harvest big, colourful pumpkins to make lanterns for Halloween! Pumpkin soup is also a tasty treat, but don't stop there, they have so much more to offer!

SweetcornSweet Corn

Sweet Corn needs plenty of space as it can grow up to 2m (6ft) tall depending on the variety, and must been grown in blocks as it is pollinated by the wind knocking together the plants so they pollenate each other.  Nothing beats fresh Sweet Corn, in fact my little lad likes nothing more than to pick a cob and munch it straight off the plant!

RadishesRadishes

The humble Radish is an incredibly easy vegetable to grow, as they tolerate most soil types and are quick to crop (usually within three weeks). They're delicious eaten raw, offering a fiery burst of flavour to salads. There's a wide variety of cultivars to choose from too, ranging from near spherical red-and-white roots, to long, thin white radishes, also known as mooli.

Growing TomatoesGrowing Tomatoes

Tomatoes fresh from the vine are hard to beat, but with the many problems with growing tomatoes, including the dreaded blight are they worth the hassle on the allotment?

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