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  • Allotments for Hatfield Peverel

    Allotments for Hatfield Peverel
    Promoting Allotment Gardening in Hatfield Peverel Essex

  • Best Allotment Competition 2017

    bac ban2017July 1st 2017 Starting 11.30am Old Site

     Thanks to all those who attended, this years competition was a great success and one of the highest turns outs I have seen, so thanks to all those that came and supported the hard work of the HPAA commitee, in particular, Julia East and Margret Hastings, Julie Ruzbridge who put in so much hard work with the lovely food, Drew Price & Simon Read for their great efforts tidying up the sites and general helpfulness on the day, The Scouts and Guides for their help laying on Coffee and Teas and agaib for all those that supported the event particularly for Carlie Mayes for her Bees and Honey display and last but no means least Gerald Vale from the National Vegetable Society for his great job as judge and talk afterwards.  Thank you all

  • Dengie 100 & Maldon Bekeepers
  • Crop Rotation: A Five-Year Plan

    5 Year Crop Rotation Plan5 Year Crop Rotation Plan

    There are many plans for crop rotation, but the most reliable is the 5 year plan as ity seperates the main vegetable categories and gives a longer-term solution

Welcome to HPAA

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  Featured Article
  Video
Rhubarb & Custard Cocktail

Rhubarb & custard cocktailRhubarb & custard cocktail
An elegant vodka-based drink that'll wow your guests - it's made with creamy advocaat iqueur and homemade fruit syrup

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  • History of the HPAA

    HPAA History

    The Hatfield Peverel Allotment Association has been around for over a hundred years, below is an article written by David Goodey and makes good reading!

     
  • Important Information


    Please take some time in reading this section carefully as it will guide you through the protocols of what is expected of each persons holding an allotment and their visitors to the allotment sites.
     
  • Hatfield Peverel Allotment Association Constitution

    Constitution

    Below we have set out the Constitution for the Hatfield Peverel Allotment Association

     
  • Cultivation Policy

    Cultivation Policy

    "Cultivation” and, more importantly “non-cultivation”, can mean different things to different people and can be interpreted in various ways. If you look around the site, you will find that there are almost as many different styles of cultivation as there are plots. It is certainly not necessary to maintain strictly regimented rows of vegetables.

 

Great Radishes to try

  • Cherry Belle Radish
    • Cherry shaped and cherry coloured. Pure crisp white flesh which is slow to go pithy and woody. Mild flavour.
  • French Breakfast Radish
    • One of the most famous varieties but I have yet to see it eaten first thing in the morning in France. Long roots of red with a white tip.
  • Mooli Radish
    • Japanese type giving long white roots with crisp flesh. Use peeled and sliced in salads or added to stir-fry cooking.
  • Munchen Bier Radish
  • Grown for seed pods. Plants should be about 6-8cm apart. Quickly goes up to flower and produce seed pods which should be used when green and crisp and can be snapped easily. Raw in salads or in a stir-fry. Spicy flavour.
  • Red Meat Radish
    • Quite large round roots with red topped white skin and delightful deep rose coloured flesh. Ideal for slicing for both fresh or stir fry use.
  • Scarlet Globe Radish
    • Good traditional variety giving lovely round roots of bright red. Suitable for early cropping under cloches.
  • Sparkler Radish
    • Attractive on a salad plate, bright red round roots with a white tip. Mild flavour and crisp flesh.
  • Summer Crunch Radish
    • Our own introduction, semi-long stump ended roots with deep pink skin with pure white tip and flesh. Sweet flavour and crisp texture.
  • Tarzan Radish
    • Excellent variety for autumn or under cover in early spring. it quickly forms roots which are very uniform. The nice, round radishes are a deep, rich red colour and keep well. Also very high yielding.
      Sowing December-March or September-October.
  • Black Spanish Long Radish
    • Long tapered roots with dark brown skin and pure white flesh. Can be left in the ground and harvested in winter or stored in dry sand in frost free shed.
  • Black Spanish Round Radish
    • The round counterpart to the above. Both have crisp tasty flesh which can be sliced or grated for use in winter salads.
  • China Rose Radish
    • Medium large oblong shaped roots with rose pink skin and pure white flesh. Can be harvested in autumn and stored in dry sand in frost free conditions.

NSALG National Allotments Week

Category: Recipes

Pasta with Asparagus and Courgette

Pasta with Asparagus and CourgettePasta with Asparagus and Courgette

 Asparagus and Courgette are made for each other in this dish!

 

Aubergine Parmigiana

Aubergine ParmigianaAubergine Parmigiana

This simple aubergine parmigiana recipe from Italy makes a cosy mid-week meal. Serve this cheese, tomato and aubergine bake as a vegetarian main dish, with some wholewheat garlic bread or a peppery rocket salad, or you can also make it as a hearty side for for a meat dish.!

 

Classic Rhubarb Crumble

Classic Rhubarb CrumbleClassic Rhubarb Crumble
Growing up this was my favourite dessert & seeing as only my dad and I liked it I always had a massive portion!

Category: The Growing Season

Jobs to do in October

Jobs to do in October

October is the month when it feels like the season is about to turn, the days start to shorten and the sun appears lower in the sky, the leaves change colour and fall to the ground and temperatures drop.  The first frost are likely too, which will be the end of many of your crops out in the open so if you still haven’t harvested frost sensitive crops now is the time before Jack Frost gets them!

 

Jobs to do in January

Jobs to do on the Allotment in January
January is generally a very cold month with hard frosts freezing the ground and when the ground isn't frozen it is generally too wet to do much although there are no guarantees with British weather. Looking through my diaries, snow isn't that likely for a prolonged period but you never know.

 

The Growing Season

The growing season

The Growing Season varies in different parts of the United Kingdom, but in Hatfield Peverel we are blessed with a milder climate and enjoy a longer season than many parts of the country.

In this section of the web site I have tried to separate the season out into monthly sections to help and guide you through the most popular tasks and crops regularly grown on the allotment site, but if you would like a feature made of a particular vegetable or task, please get in touch and I will do my best to add it to the web site for you.

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