See other templatesSee other templates
  • Allotments for Hatfield Peverel

    Allotments for Hatfield Peverel
    Promoting Allotment Gardening in Hatfield Peverel Essex

  • Best Allotment Competition 2017

    bac ban2017July 1st 2017 Starting 11.30am Old Site

     Thanks to all those who attended, this years competition was a great success and one of the highest turns outs I have seen, so thanks to all those that came and supported the hard work of the HPAA commitee, in particular, Julia East and Margret Hastings, Julie Ruzbridge who put in so much hard work with the lovely food, Drew Price & Simon Read for their great efforts tidying up the sites and general helpfulness on the day, The Scouts and Guides for their help laying on Coffee and Teas and agaib for all those that supported the event particularly for Carlie Mayes for her Bees and Honey display and last but no means least Gerald Vale from the National Vegetable Society for his great job as judge and talk afterwards.  Thank you all

  • Dengie 100 & Maldon Bekeepers
  • Crop Rotation: A Five-Year Plan

    5 Year Crop Rotation Plan5 Year Crop Rotation Plan

    There are many plans for crop rotation, but the most reliable is the 5 year plan as ity seperates the main vegetable categories and gives a longer-term solution

Welcome to HPAA

loading...
  HPAA Docs
  Featured Article
  Video
Rhubarb & Custard Cocktail

Rhubarb & custard cocktailRhubarb & custard cocktail
An elegant vodka-based drink that'll wow your guests - it's made with creamy advocaat iqueur and homemade fruit syrup

Read more
  • Hatfield Peverel Allotment Association Constitution

    Constitution

    Below we have set out the Constitution for the Hatfield Peverel Allotment Association

     
  • Cultivation Policy

    Cultivation Policy

    "Cultivation” and, more importantly “non-cultivation”, can mean different things to different people and can be interpreted in various ways. If you look around the site, you will find that there are almost as many different styles of cultivation as there are plots. It is certainly not necessary to maintain strictly regimented rows of vegetables.

     
  • Important Information


    Please take some time in reading this section carefully as it will guide you through the protocols of what is expected of each persons holding an allotment and their visitors to the allotment sites.
     
  • History of the HPAA

    HPAA History

    The Hatfield Peverel Allotment Association has been around for over a hundred years, below is an article written by David Goodey and makes good reading!

Growing CauliflowerGrowing Cauliflower

Growing Cauliflowers

Cauliflowers do best in very fertile soil, and digging in a bucketful of well-rotted manure or organic matter before planting, and raking in 150g per sq m of Growmore or other general purpose fertiliser, will help growth. Firm the soil by treading before planting.

If growth is checked, at any time during growth, they produce small, deformed heads. To avoid problems, water plants well the day before transplanting and make a hole deep enough to hold the plant with the lowest leaves at ground level. Fill this hole repeatedly with water. This will fill the hole with soil and ensure the plant is sitting in a large area of moist soil. Firm the soil very well against the roots

Space summer and autumn cropping types 60cm (2ft) apart and winter cultivars 75cm (2.5ft) apart; spacing 30-45cm (12-18in) apart, provides mini, 'one person' curds.

Water well in dry weather, watering every 10 days, and applying sufficient water to thoroughly wet the root zone. Once the plants are growing well, add 30g per square metre of high nitrogen fertiliser such as sulphate of ammonia or Growmore to boost growth and curd formation.

cauliflower870-5Blanching CauliflowerWhen and How to Blanch Cauliflower

Cauliflower needs cool temperatures, a consistent supply of moisture and lots of fertilizer. To get white curds on many varieties, it is necessary to tie up the leaves around the developing curd.

The first thing to know is when to blanch a cauliflower head. Start checking your plants about 30 days after transplanting your seedlings. The curds develop quickly and it’s that development that tells you when to blanch. A cauliflower curd about the size of a chicken egg is perfect. Smaller curds are already protected from the light by the leaves surrounding them. As they grow, they become more exposed and this is the time to begin blanching. Cauliflower curds develop rapidly into full heads so the window is small.

Cauliflower is extremely susceptible to fungus, so the second condition of when to blanch a cauliflower would be the driest part of the day. You don’t want to trap moisture inside your leaf cover. How to blanch cauliflower successfully is the next step.

When the curd is 2 to 3 inches in diameter (about the size of that egg) the large outer leaves should be tied up and over the emerging curds. The easiest way to do this is to tie the leaves with rubber bands, tape or twine. If you’re using rubber bands, be sure they are sturdy enough to contain the growing leaves and heads. The leaves should be tied loosely to give the curds plenty of room to grow.

Since the curds develop at different rates, you’ll need to check your plants for several days, tying up those that are ready. If your planting is large, using a different color band or string for each day will prove useful for harvest, as those heads that were tied first will be ready for harvest first. Time from tying to harvest varies from 4 to 5 days during warm spring weather to 14 to 21 days during the cool days of autumn.

 

NSALG National Allotments Week

Category: Recipes

Oca or Potato Homity Pie Recipe

Homity PieHomity Pie

Homity pie is a traditional British open vegetable pie. The pastry case traditionally contains a filling of potatoes and an onion and leek mixture, which is then covered with cheese.  It has a history that dates back to the efforts of the Land girls of the Second World War and the restrictions imposed by wartime rationing.

 

Lamb Cutlets with Butternut Squash & Mint

Lamb Cutlets with Butternut Squash, Beans, and MintLamb Cutlets with Butternut Squash & Mint

Simply delicious one of my all time favourites

 

Baked Salmon & Asparagus with Jersey Royal's

Baked Salmon & Asparagus with Jersey Royal'sBaked Salmon & Asparagus with Jersey Royal's

Tasty and so easy to make, great dinner party dish or a cracking family treat, and a healthy dish too especially if like me you have an Asparagus Bed or two!.

Category: The Growing Season

Jobs to do in June

Jobs to do in June

Summer should be here!

Usually the risk of frost has passed by now, and with longer days there comes more sunshine and time to be in your allotment. If the weather is dry, then water your seed drills well before sowing any seeds – this way the young plants will develop a good root system.

 

The Growing Season

The growing season

The Growing Season varies in different parts of the United Kingdom, but in Hatfield Peverel we are blessed with a milder climate and enjoy a longer season than many parts of the country.

In this section of the web site I have tried to separate the season out into monthly sections to help and guide you through the most popular tasks and crops regularly grown on the allotment site, but if you would like a feature made of a particular vegetable or task, please get in touch and I will do my best to add it to the web site for you.

 

Jobs to do in May

Jobs to do in May

May is usually one of the busiest months

The soil is warm and the plants growing well. But watch out for a sneaky late frost.

Go to top